activism, dark fiction, dark poems, dark poetry, dark writing, Fiction, freedom, K.G. Bethlehem, life, literature, love, poems, poetry, Uncategorized, writer, writing

Relapse (Friday Night Poetry Corner #184)

Manila: My City at War | Ayala Museum
Ayala Museum
“Now but a valley of shudders was Manila, where the famine had become visible as bloated bodies collapsed on the sidewalks.”

 

 

Good evening ladies and gentleman and welcome to another Friday Night Poetry Corner. This week will be about me! Well, my poem at least. This is an older joint I wrote back in 2002 called “Relapse, a killa among men.” The voice in this could be recognizable to some in different parts of their life, as a welcoming thought or a reminder of something horrible.

It’s up to your own imagination. Thanks again for stopping by.

 

 

Relapse
(a killa’ among men)

rotten alliance I
believed called
KAM
dangerous acts preceding
others…
you asked for excitement
and received, KAM
craving for attention,
suitable compliance.
I see,
naw, you conceived
the egoism of
society, but still
sought for
KAM

whirlwind
by breeze
upfront
waterspout
to rainfall
doubt
trouble ground
shakes
prolonged light
fight sheet storms
of landslide pawns,
in spirit is
KAM

you adore wonders, without
insight of its
origins…

Who is KAM?
Certain leaders who grin
and speak with no honor?

Naive masses
cries “whatever”
souljahs gripe for meaning beyond
the information war.

hands in Bushes
marvels
the WAR.

 

                                                                                By K.G. Bethlehem

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Fiction, freedom, life, literature, nature poems, poems, poetry, poetry readings, Uncategorized, writer, writing

Friday Night Poetry Corner #170–Beauty Is In Freedom

 

Good day everyone and welcome to another Friday Night Poetry Corner!! This week I am showcasing a remarkable poet, Sourav “Teddy” Biswas who poems are so hauntingly beautiful, it begs for you to ask for more. The name of this piece is called “Beauty is in Freedom!” Also if you have a chance check out his excellent poetry book called “Some Voices of a Closed Lip.”

Some'n Unique Magazine, LLC

By
Sourav “Teddy” Biswas

freedom-in-christ Photographer: Unk. Title: Freedom is beautiful. Website: thepreachersword.com. Dated: 20 April 2017

Life is hard. We all are tied to responsibilities we can’t ignore. Reaching the pinnacle of success is what we all yearn for. But in this process we fail to realize what is beautiful. Beauty, as  now in the society, is synonymous to being attractive and popular. And all these beauty hardly reflects the spirit of a human being. The liberation of a human heart from all sins and prejudice is the truest definition of beauty.

Water flow in reminisce sorrow,
Spool ticks in waves of noises,
the beauty folds in the sleeping sight
Tonight the sun rose again,
devoid by the winter winds,
when the stars found their light
in thee eyes.

Embers of paradise found thee,
where the sun rose in farthest dreams
No life born without love of thee
for what brings…

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Douglass…

Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey was born into slavery on the Eastern Shore of Maryland in February 1818. Frederick’s life was difficult as he barely knew his mother. She lived on a different plantation and died when he was an adolescent. Frederick also did no who his father was and later discovered the identity of his father.

Frederick at a young age was forbidden to attend school but understood the connection between knowledge and freedom. Being able to read will help secure freedom for himself and ultimately his people. When he was at the age of 12, he read a book called The Columbian Orator. It was a collection of revolutionary speeches, debates, and writings on natural human rights.

When Frederick was 15 years of age, he was sent to a slave plantation in Eastern Shore Maryland and rebelled throughout his time there. He was beaten and tormented due to his thirst for freedom and defiance towards enslavement under the system of racism white supremacy.

Frederick later returned to Baltimore, Maryland. He then met a young free black woman named Anna Murray, who agreed to help him escape. On September 3, 1838, he disguised himself as a sailor and boarded a northbound train and used the money Anna gave him to pay for his ticket. Frederick arrived in New York City within a day and declared himself free.

In 1861, the Civil War began in the United States. Frederick Douglass worked hard to make emancipation from slavery a possibly when the war ended. He leads calls and recruited African-American men to fight in the United States Army which included two of his sons. They fought in the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. The movie Glory, starring Denzel Washington was based on the fighting 54th!

As the war continued Frederick Douglas continued his fight for freedom for all African-Americans who were still in bondage of the wicket system of oppression. He helps convinced President Abraham Lincoln to push for The 13th Amendment (ratified in 1865) abolished slavery, the 14th Amendment (ratified in 1868) granted national birthright citizenship, and the 15th Amendment (ratified in 1870) stated nobody could be denied voting rights on the basis of race, skin color, or previous servitude. Frederick Douglas also married his longtime love Anne Douglas.

In 1872, the Douglass family moved to Washington, D.C and After the fall of Reconstruction, Frederick Douglass managed to retain high-ranking federal appointments. He served under five presidents as U.S. Marshal for D.C. (1877-1881), Recorder of Deeds for D.C. (1881-1886), and Minister Resident and Consul General to Haiti (1889-1891). Significantly, he held these positions at a time when violence and fraud severely restricted African-American political activism. Frederick continued a tenuous speaking tour schedule. His speeches continued to agitate for racial equality and women’s rights. In 1881, Douglass published his third autobiography, Life and Times of Frederick Douglass.

A sad note, tragedy struck Douglass’s life in 1882 when Anna died from a stroke. He remarried in 1884 to Helen Pitts, an activist and the daughter of former abolitionists.

On February 20, 1895, Douglass attended a meeting of the National Council of Women. He arrived home to Cedar Hill, hours later he regrettably suffered a heart attack and passed away. Frederick was 77. He had remained a powerful figure in the battle for equality and justice for his entire life.

As you can see, throughout this article are pictures from Douglass’s home in Washington DC, when he served in the Federal Government along with his activism. The furniture in this house are the same ones that Frederick Douglass used when he was still living. As you can see the old time look of the house, the kitchen, and local appliances. The individual rooms of Frederick and his first and second wives as it was customary for married couples to sleep in separate rooms. His first wife Anne, when they first moved into the DC dwelling was mostly confined to a wheelchair for the rest of her life. The same wheelchair is seen in her room. The pictures of the living room and dining room were still frozen in time as well as the numerous pictures showcased throughout the house. There were rooms for her grandchildren in the attic but sadly I was unable to see it due to the condition of it during the initial tour.

For anyone in the Washington DC area, you can request a tour of the Frederick Douglass house at any time. For more details on obtaining tour passes as well as fees, parking and location please visit https://www.nps.gov/frdo/planyourvisit/fees.htm.

Frederick Douglass House in DC